Is Achieving Success A Numbers Game

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The other day while at the after school program me and the other instructor were confronted with a question, “How do you inspire success in today’s youth?”

This question brought about many answers and solutions with no actual proof that any of it would work. We begin to ask questions like, “What is it that will catch and keep their attention?” and “What is it that they are truly passionate about?” The research began and I came across some interesting numbers. These numbers are the reason for this post.

What College Graduates Have to Look Forward to. 

In the Spring an estimated 2.8 million college graduates entered the U.S. workforce with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. At a time when unemployment rates are still at its lowest level in seven years.

This generation makes up about 40 percent of unemployed persons in the U.S., says Anthony Carnevale, a director and research professor for Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce.

As of May, data shown that 13.8 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds are out of work. These numbers are encouraging, as they are declining over the years, but they are still above the national jobless rate of 5.4 percent.

“If you look at the numbers starting in 2009, we’ve been in the longest sustained period of unemployment since the Bureau of Labor Statistics began collecting their data following World War II,” says David Pasch, a spokesman for Generation Opportunity.

via Millennial College Graduates: Young, Educated, Jobless

Today, nearly half of all students who begin college do not graduate within six years.

via Fact Sheet: Focusing Higher Education on Student Success | U.S. Department of Education.

What if you want to be a professional athlete?

Many boys and girls grow up dreaming of playing sports in college and then on to the ranks of the pros. With nearly eight million students participating in high school athletics in the US, only 16% of them will compete at the NCAA level. And  only a fraction of them will become professional athletes.

These numbers are discouraging but lets look at those who are successful at it.

Michael Jordan is known as the greatest basketball player to grace to court of the pros. He was denied at the high school level and went on to 5 MVP awards, six NBA championships, six Finals MVP awards, a 14-time All Star and 10 scoring titles.

These are all perfectly decent reasons why he has become the most inspirational player of all-times.

I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games; 26 times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. — Michael Jordan

Kobe Bryant, another great basketball player with stats similar to Jordan’s, wakes at 5:30 every morning to work out. He eats five times a day, a special diet, stressing not just the ingredients but the way they’re cooked.

He studies tapes of not just him but those of world players with the curiosity of a scientist . As a kid, he studied basketball cards in order to see which moves the players were showcasing and which muscles were firing during the moves. He can look at a still photo of himself making a shot from any game and tell you exactly when, where, and what happened.

He has spent hours at a time chasing tennis balls along the floor. Running the same patterns again and again on an empty court to get his cuts right. He would run steps, run suicides,and run distance all to prepare for the game.

I tell you all this not to say that Mike and Kobe are special. The fact is they are, not because of their talents, but because of their work ethic.

What are successful people doing differently?

When we see people who have succeed we typically say, “They are such naturals.” No, they are successful because they work harder than everyone else. They are not afraid to fail.

They get up at 5 am to start their workout. They are the first ones in and the last ones out.

I remember being afraid of snakes. Not like the average person who just avoids them but my heart starts to beat faster and faster. I can hear my heart beat even when I know they can’t harm me. I went home one year and had a talk with my god-father. He told me that when I was young a snake crawled across me while I was sleep.

It took me years to get that fear under control. The reality is that fear does not exist. It is simply the product of a past situation that obviously didn’t kill you. If you want a successful relationship, you can’t allow your fears from past failures to get in the way.

You see, successful people do not allow their fears to prevent them from moving forward.

Most importantly successful people know not to quite. When the voices in your head tells you that you’re not good enough, don’t you quite. If they tell you, you cant do it, don’t you quite. When your friends and family tells your crazy, don’t quite. But Travis I don’t have the training, don’t quite, and get the training.

But Travis I don’t have the time, don’t quite. Go to bed late and get up early. What ever it takes to get you to your destiny, you must not quite.

“I have not failed 10,000 times. I have successfully found 10,000 ways that will not work.” Thomas Edison

I was fortunate to find a community that helped me with this. They provided me with the tool, resources, training, and a mentor to take me to the next level. If you want to find out more about this community, check out my good friend Justice as he shows you how he fired his boss.

Remember, inch by inch, mile by mile, and day by day. Never give up. Check out this snippet from Any GIven Sunday.

P.S. Remember sharing is caring – Share with someone on social media that you think may benefit from this.

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